Annotating as Interactivity for Open Pedagogy (July 27 Webinar)

Explore hands on and share your own experiences or interests in web annotation, maybe one of the most versatile and opportunity ripe tools to apply in open pedagogy. Think of it as an open notes, a discussion layer atop the entire web. What can you do there?

Join us for a live webinar session 2021-07-27T19:00:00Z If you have not attended one of these before you can get access by registering online. But as we are providing all materials below you can just follow along later at your own pace, that’s how we roll asynchronously.


I Annotate Therefore I Am flickr photo by cogdogblog shared under a Creative Commons (BY) license

Web annotation combines one of the more traditional academic practices of highlighting and taking notes in the margin, but expands the potential by placing it in common, open spaces. It was a brief experimental feature in the first web browser (Mosaic) but has has come back as a web standard. With the open source platform Hypothesis (https://hypothes.is/), learners can add commentary, discussion, additional resources to any public content on the web. Hypothesis is fully open source requires no specific platform, so activities can be anchored in your LMS, a website, a document, a discussion space.

In this session, let’s annotate some open pedagogy together and brainstorm activities you might develop for your own teaching. If you do not have an account already, create one at https://hypothes.is/signup Or come with other ideas, questions, approaches, for adding interactivity to your open practices.

What’s your interest, experience in annotation? Let us know!

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There are more than many easily google-able resource sites that explain Hypothes.is an web annotation- start with https://web.hypothes.is/ and see more specific information, ideas, and examples under Hypothesis for Education.

I highly recommend as well the Annotation book from MIT Press by Remi Kalir and Antero Garcia.

Enough Talk, Let’s Annotate

Hypothes.is offers browser add on tools that allow you to see and make annotations on any public web page (or PDF available via a URL).

But for these examples we are making it easy by using published open content on sites where Hypothes.is is pre-enabled (e.g. in Pressbooks) or by special “via” links that will also make the tools available.

For our first Annotate Together activity we are visiting the Open Pedagogy page from the Open Pedagogy Notebook.. Go ahead, click!

You know Hypothes.is is enabled if you see in the top right corner a gray button with a < symbol. Also, sections of the page highlighted in yellow indicate the presence of annotations by other people.

Upon opening the tools via the < button you see the annotation tools and existing notes. If you are not logged in, you can do it here and even create an account if you have not done so already.

I have added an annotation to the first sentence (after taking the screen shot) as a place to practice first writing a reply to an annotation.

And as an example of one small value of this tool is that every annotation you make is available as a unique web address. Open my note, and reply.

https://hyp.is/OfzOIO47EeuQxucKiFW2RQ/openpedagogy.org/open-pedagogy/

Do the presence of other annotations (and a darker color indicating more notes) provide an incentive to explore? See of there are other notes worth responding to.

Or practice writing your own. Just select the portion of your text that you are attaching a note to, and click Annotate from the popup.

A highlight can be useful too, if you just want to collect key passages.

If you want to have learners share annotations across sources, you can create private groups, or more open, as them to tag their annotations. See what happens if you tag your annotations in this workshop opsa

https://hypothes.is/search?q=opsa

And more useful things you can do is by exploring the person icon in the Hypothes.is tools, and click the item with your name. Hypothes.is creates a public profile of your own annotation activity and provides it as your own library- here is mine.

https://hypothes.is/u/cogdog

Think of all the annotations you may have made in different books, printed copies of articles… all available in one place.

And there are ways to combine search to find all tagged annotations by one user

https://hypothes.is/users/cogdog?q=opsa

More Open Pedagogy Annotations

Choose other sources to explore the discussions existing or to add your own notes, contributions. Use the opsa tag for something worth sharing with other Open Pedagogy Summer Adventure participants. All of these links will open with Hypothes.is tools enabled

We Annotated, Now What?

That’s what the discussion here is for. If you have been successful with web annotation activities, please share them in a reply. Or if you know of examples from elsewhere. If you are struggling to design an activity? Let us know what questions you have.

More Stuff

Crowdlaaers - a tool for generating analytics from annotation on a single source. See the results for our first annotation activity

Speculative Annotation (Library of Congress) an open-source dynamic web application and public art project by Library of Congress Innovator in Residence Courtney McClellan. The tool presents a unique mini collection of Free to Use items from the Library of Congress for students, teachers, and users of all ages to annotate through captions, drawings, and other types of markmaking. Working with curators at the Library and students and teachers in the classroom, McClellan developed Speculative Annotation to provide a way for students to speak back to history.

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In response to question from @paulstacey during webinar, a means to export annotations is described here How do I export my annotations? : Hypothesis

The tool lets you enter many search parameters and offers download in HTML, CSV, and JSON format - here is a link for downloading all annotations tagged opsa (I am not seeing too many! Go annotate and tag!)

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Here is the recording from yesterday. Once again @cogdog gave us no slides, but lots of links!

And here’s a bonus link shared by one of the attendees about how Hypothes.is has been used in the classroom:

Has anyone (besides @cynthia) annotated? Looking for annotations tagged opsa https://hypothes.is/search?q=opsa

bueller-annotate

There are many ways to annotate- see this exciting new creative project from the Library of Congress that opens up public domain content to be annotated in many ways (not just text)

https://annotation.labs.loc.gov/

Speculative Annotation is an open-source dynamic web application and public art project by Library of Congress Innovator in Residence Courtney McClellan. The tool presents a unique mini collection of Free to Use items from the Library of Congress for students, teachers, and users of all ages to annotate through captions, drawings, and other types of markmaking. Working with curators at the Library and students and teachers in the classroom, McClellan developed Speculative Annotation to provide a way for students to speak back to history.

Speculative Annotation connects items from the past with the day-to-day experience of users. It was made with a K-12 audience in mind, with the hope that primary sources from the Library’s collection will be used by educators. The items are shared with contextual aids including curator annotations and links to additional resources for further research on the Library’s website.

Learn more at an upcoming webinar “Annotation as a Creative Act”

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